• Plant Conservation: Can we meet the great challenges we face? A talk by Ian Wright (National Trust). Tuesday 30th January 2018. See Events section for information.
Devon Gardens Trust is devoted to the preservation and enhancement of gardens in the UK county of Devon

Stevenstone

Statutory Designation: 

Garden walls adjacent w of Orangery and Ha-ha adj. w of Stevenstone House terrace ruins, terrace walls 19m s and 24m gateway 120m e,  gate-piers 3m e of East Lodge, South Lodge, gateway 2m. e, ruins of Stevenstone House, and deer shelter all listed Grade II.  The Library and The Orangery listed Grade II*.

District: 
Torridge
Parish: 
St Giles in the Wood
Grid ref: 
SS 527 194
Map no: 
Landranger 180
Type of site: 
Parkland to a ruined house.
Description: 

Stevenstone was the principal seat of the Rolle family in the C18tand C19.  A C16 building, it was remodelled c1700 and again in the 1870s, when the grounds were landscaped by Milner.  It was reduced in size just before the First World War.  Polwhele noted in 1797 that ‘an oak tree was cut through about 1776, the body of which measured thirteen feet six inches in diameter; and on the plane of the section two couples danced a country dance.’  In 1806 he wrote that ‘the park is well wooded and watered.’  Lysons wrote that ‘there is a deer park at Stevenstone in which are some red deer.’  White (1850) noted that it was ‘a fine old mansion, with a deer park and is occasionally occupied by Lady Rolle.'’ The sale particulars for the estate in 1909, then of over 6000 acres, mention the ‘grandly-timbered deer park’ of 500 acres, bamboo plantation, ornamental lake with boat house, three fish ponds and a series of miniature lakes, pleasure grounds with a pinetum of 60 to 70 varieties of pine and other coniferae, tea pavilion, pergola, several glass-houses, fernery, kitchen garden and five lodges.  Surviving garden features include two 18th century pavilions (a library and an orangery), ha-ha, terraces and walled garden.  There are 19th century garden walls, lodges, outbuildings, gateways and estate cottages.  The house was abandoned in about 1945, is now a ruin and the two pavilions were taken over by the Landmark Trust in 1978.

Conservation Area: 
No
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty: 
No
Area of Great Landscape Value: 
No
Nature Conservation Zone: 
No
Coastal Preservation Area: 
No
National Park: 
No
Scheduled: 
No
Evidence: 
MapView plan, scale 1:4000 Ordnance Survey 2nd edition, 1905, scale 6” (WCSL sheet 30NW) Getmapping aerial photograph 1:2500 Historic Maps c1880 scale 1:2500
References: 
Cherry & Pevsner: The Buildings of England – Devon, 1989: 88, 89, 94, 109, 153, 258, 460, 627, 707, 760 S Pugsley: Devon Gardens – An Historical Survey, 1994: 91, 140-42 T Gray: The Garden History of Devon, 1995: 209-10
Status: 
on Devon Gazetteer